Visitors walking to Tower Rock, Missouri
Visitors walking to Tower Rock, Missouri

Mississippi River Hits New Lows

Dry weather causes water levels on the Mississippi River to drop.

The Mississippi River is the second-longest river in the United States. It flows through ten different states for about 2,350 miles (3,780 km). But now, the river’s water levels are dropping. And people all along the river are seeing the effects.

Many areas along the Mississippi are seeing historically low water levels. That includes the city of Memphis, Tennessee. Between July and October of this year, the water levels there have dropped by over 10 feet (3 m). On October 17, officials said the waters had reached a record low. Experts say high temperatures and dry weather are causing these conditions.

The river’s low levels have revealed rarely seen land. Tower Rock usually pokes up about 60 feet (18.2 meters) above the water. It sits on Missouri’s side of the Mississippi River. The waters around the rock can be as deep as 37.5 feet (11.4 meters). You’d usually need a boat to get there.

But on October 21, the waters around Tower Rock dropped to under 1 foot (0.3 meters) deep. This revealed the base of Tower Rock’s island. It also showed a path that people could use. have been heading to the island to check out, and even climb, the tower. Officials have been asking visitors to be careful. “The Mississippi River is still a very dangerous water body,” said one official.

The low water levels have caused problems for some businesses. Farmers use the Mississippi River to ship goods like corn, soybeans, and cotton. When water levels drop, land is . This is causing delays for ships.

People are doing their best to handle the situation. Some businesses are looking for other ways to their goods. Officials in Tennessee Valley are looking to release water from nearby dams to boost the river.

However, experts say the dry weather will likely continue through the winter. People will have to wait and see.

Updated October 25, 2022, 5:02 P.M. (ET)
By Tyler Burdick

Mississippi River Hits New Lows

Dry weather causes water levels on the Mississippi River to drop.

Visitors walking to Tower Rock, Missouri
Visitors walking to Tower Rock, Missouri

The Mississippi River is the second-longest river in the United States. It flows through ten different states for about 2,350 miles (3,780 km). But now, the river’s water levels are dropping. And people all along the river are seeing the effects.

Many areas along the Mississippi are seeing historically low water levels. That includes the city of Memphis, Tennessee. Between July and October of this year, the water levels there have dropped by over 10 feet (3 m). On October 17, officials said the waters had reached a record low. Experts say high temperatures and dry weather are causing these conditions.

The river’s low levels have revealed rarely seen land. Tower Rock usually pokes up about 60 feet (18.2 meters) above the water. It sits on Missouri’s side of the Mississippi River. The waters around the rock can be as deep as 37.5 feet (11.4 meters). You’d usually need a boat to get there.

But on October 21, the waters around Tower Rock dropped to under 1 foot (0.3 meters) deep. This revealed the base of Tower Rock’s island. It also showed a path that people could use. have been heading to the island to check out, and even climb, the tower. Officials have been asking visitors to be careful. “The Mississippi River is still a very dangerous water body,” said one official.

The low water levels have caused problems for some businesses. Farmers use the Mississippi River to ship goods like corn, soybeans, and cotton. When water levels drop, land is . This is causing delays for ships.

People are doing their best to handle the situation. Some businesses are looking for other ways to their goods. Officials in Tennessee Valley are looking to release water from nearby dams to boost the river.

However, experts say the dry weather will likely continue through the winter. People will have to wait and see.

Updated October 25, 2022, 5:02 P.M. (ET)
By Tyler Burdick

Draw it AskRuss